It’s very important for kids to learn organizing skills to increase their chances at being successful in school. Often times such skills are not taught in school, but yet the expectations of being able to juggle 5 or 6 classes worth of work is still there. Working with your child and teaching organizing skills at home will give your child the solid foundation he or she needs in order to do well in school, have good self-esteem, and have the courage and confidence to try new things.

A good place to start is to set up a study zone. Find out where your child likes to do homework. Does your child need complete silence to concentrate or is background music preferred? Every child learns differently and so it’s important to do a little investigating if you don’t already know how your child learns best. The study zone can be in your child’s bedroom, at the kitchen table, or maybe even in the basement or a spare guest room. Wherever it is, make sure there’s a large enough flat surface to write on (preferably a desk), it’s free of distractions (TV, cell phones, and away from high-traffic areas, if possible), it’s comfortable (equipped with a proper chair, moderate temperature, and good lighting) and all supplies are stored nearby for easy access.

Set up a desktop filing system. Just like adults have a lot of paper to manage each day, so do students. A great way to keep paper organized is to set up a desktop filing system (a 10″ x 12″ box without a lid that sits right on top of the desk for easy access). There should be a file for each class for storing notes, as well as a few personal files (in the back) for storing … READ MORE ...


Afterschool activities, homeschool get-togethers, and coffee with friends while the kids played were a large part of our pre-travel days. Melbourne has an abundance of activities, excursions, and groups for homeschoolers, spoiling us for choice of activities to participate in. We usually went along to along to a few each week. Then there were the afterschool activities; swimming, tennis, drama, pottery, gymnastics, dancing, violin lessons etc that we did at various times. How would we go without these?

We have missed the homeschool get-togethers, and gatherings at friends’ houses. There isn’t actually a substitute that we’ve found for them ‘on the road’. HEA have a wonderful resource on their website for finding other homeschool groups as we travel. We haven’t actually done much of this, though, there is the potential there when we feel the need. There have been phone calls and emails at times back to friends in Melbourne, who are still thought of as if we had seen them only a few weeks ago.

We thought that kids would probably appreciate being able to converse with other travelling children. That’s a bit harder to do than say, as travelling families in Australia are spread out across the country. Therefore, the ability to have an online chat in a protected environment for registered users only here is a promising new resource. It has been organised for the kids to be able to chat at 9am on Friday mornings, and 5pm on Monday nights (Melbourne time) We are homeschoolers, even before we started travelling, but have tried schools a few times so that the kids can interact with some other children. Peter and Susan tried two different country schools in Victoria for two weeks each to have a play. Peter really liked one of them, and found that … READ MORE ...