Special Education Teacher – 5 Essential Qualities Of A Good SEN Teacher

Special Education Teacher - 5 Essential Qualities Of A Good SEN Teacher

The fundamental rule of imparting special education to children with special learning needs is to accept the kid ‘at his / her individual’ level and to design a learning program best suited to the strengths of the person.

To fulfill this goal, folks and care-givers of kids with special needs and heads of special schools must employ good SEN teachers who will be instrumental in experiencing this all-round progression of the learners.

Learning about the 5 essential qualities of the good special educator brings you much closer to your main goal of hiring the top candidate: read on to determine what they are!

1. A good special needs teacher must possess industry certifications as a way to plan, implement and make improvements to group teaching and 1:1 teaching programs, according to the needs of a school or individual curriculum, because the case may be. Thus, a licensed or experienced special education needs (SEN) teacher could have the data and qualifications necessary to base the framework of your Individualized Education Plan (IEP) around the current degree of learning of your child and hang correct objectives for the learner in their care, which is what’s forced to facilitate optimum training programs.

2. Good SEN teachers concentrate on assessing the social skills, learning behavior, and positive reinforcers that help a specific child with special learning needs pick-up educationally relevant and individually needed functional skill-sets becoming a well-adjusted, capable individual.

3. A good special educator will discover all or any aspects of the child’s special education needs, including performance in motor, self-help, socialization, and vocabulary skills besides improving scholastic functioning. To develop these functional skills to your satisfactory level, a passionate SEN teacher works in a very consistent manner to help you the special child achieve these towards the best of her or his …

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Mobile Learning – In the Beginning, There Was the Abacus

Mobile Learning - In the Beginning, There Was the Abacus

“Math is tough. Math is complicated. Math is boring.”

Fortunately or unfortunately, math is very important. Mathematics is the most trusted subject in nearly all career, and frequently high paying jobs demand somebody who can “do the math”.

According to the 2007 Department of Education statistics, only 31% of eighth-graders scored at or higher “proficient” level on standardized math tests. In some school districts, high-school-algebra failure rates approach 50%.

From the first abacus, the teaching and learning of mathematics have long been difficult. Over the last two decades, educational ‘technologists’ have developed and studied the uses of computers, particularly for mathematics education. The necessity of a handheld device for mathematical uses has been around development within the past many years.

The recent past saw advanced calculators manufactured by a couple of leading makers, like Casio and Texas Instrument, which were designed to provide specific applications for mathematics learning.

Similarly, TI’s handheld mathematical PDAs offered solutions to many challenges such as helping teachers know which students had a downside to which mathematical concept in “real-time”, and enabling students to independently experiment and explore concepts since they are taught.

The option of a ubiquitous technology like m-learning can play a powerful part in teaching and learning of mathematics.

In the article, “Cellphonometry: Can Kids Learn Math From Smartphones?” Mcdougal details how schools are successfully partnering with mobile-phone companies to assist kids to conquer math. The results speak by themselves.

Similarly, an experiment conducted from the National Taiwan Normal University indicated that mobile learning improves students’ capacity to connect the dots between mathematical theories and practical problem solving, along with their attitude towards learning math.

The reason conventional math is recognized as tedious is often that lessons are taught as static numbers on a page. Math itself is an interactive subject, and students …

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